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Posts Tagged ‘Stereo Microscope’

I had enought his dull peeler for a little while.  It hasn’t been sharp since the first day I bought it.  I finally decided to but another one.  The new one is sharp.  I gentle slide the new peeler on the surface of an apple.  The peel just separate from the pulp without much effort.  The two peelers have different styles and blade coating.  I was curious about why the new peeler worked so well while the old not so well.

My old peeler (white) and old peeler (black)

I looked them under my stereo microscope.  The width of the edge of the sharp peeler (~30 uM) was only 1/3 of the dull peeler.  The dull peeler seems to have a flat surface on the edge (~100 uM). The thick and flat surface is the reason that my old peeler would not peel smoothly.

The sharp peeler under stereo microscope

The sharp peeler under stereo microscope

The dull peeler under stereo microscope

The dull peeler under stereo microscope

The picture was taken with Tucsen Microscope Camera from the eyepiece of Ample Scientific SMPlus_24 stereo microscope.

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The delicious fruit, fig, is actually a flower.  After long hot and humid summer, my brown turkey fig is finally in full production.  I can usually harvet half dozen a day.

This is my first attempt to use Canon EOS T1i with my Ample Scientific SM Plus-13 stereo microscope.  My canon adapter only accept the 23 mm eye piece port so I added the adapter ring from the Tucsen relay lens.  It is a little bit loose but it worked out just fine.  The camera settings: ISO 100, 1 second exposure and auto white balance.

Yum, I can smell the sweet nectar of the brown turkey fig.

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Beach sand is the most beautiful thing to look at under a stereo microscope.   The sparkling beach sand are formed by the erosion and weathering of rocks by tidal waves and winds. The rocks eroded by streams and rivers might be carried and settled in the beach.  Aside from the elements from the rocks of the inland, the beach sand might also contains the deposits of the marine lives, such as coral and sea shells.  Polished by the tidal waves, they are just pretty to look at.

I found a thin layer of sand settled on the bottom of the bucket which we used to collect sea shells on the trip to Clearwater Beach last summer.  I just learned a simple method to collect sand specimens using a piece of paper and adhesive tape.  I was able to recover some from the bucket and put it under the microscope for observation. 

The Beach Sand Collected from the Florida Beach Contains many different types of Sands. The harder materials seems to maintain their shapes. The softer sands seems to be more rounded. 

The Beach Sand Collected from the Clear Water beach.

The Beach Sand Collected from the Clear Water beach. The sand shows different color, shapes and composition.

The Beach Sand Collected from the Clear Water Beach.

The Beach Sand Collected from the Clear Water Beach.

The Beach Sand Collected from the Clear Water beach.

The Beach Sand Collected from the Clear Water beach. The harder crystals seem to maintain their shapes.

There are plenty of marine life around the beach.  No surprise to see the pieces of sea shell here.

There are plenty of marine life around the beach. No surprise to see the pieces of sea shell here.

A piece of sea shell becomes very porous after years of erosion.

A piece of sea shell becomes very porous after years of erosion.

Another piece of sea shell

Another piece of sea shell

This one seems to be a sand dollar that has been eroded the wave

This one seems to be a sand dollar that has been eroded by the wave.

A piece of coral was found in the sand specimen

A piece of coral was found in the sand specimen

Not sure what's this

Not sure what's this

The specimen is either observed at 20X or 40X using Ample Scientific SM-Plus-13 stereo microscope.  The pictures were taken with Tucsen 3.0 MP CMOS microscope camera.

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Previously, I found some bubbles in the Ruby.  I am not sure what they are but I turned the rubby over and look at the culet of the ruby. Those bubbles seems to run from the crack of the under side and extended to the interior the ruby.

I turned the ruby over to show the underside of the stone.

I turned the ruby over to show the underside of the stone.

The bubbles in the ruby seems to run in lines

The bubbles in the ruby seems to run in lines

The cracks of the ruby seems to come from the surface of the edge and the bottom

The cracks of the ruby seems to come from the surface of the edge and the bottom

Some Backgound about the rubies:

The ruby is pink to blood-red colored gemstone, a variety of the mineral corundum (aluminium oxide). The red color is caused mainly by the presence of the element chromium.  The ruby is considered one of the four precious stones, together with the sapphire, the emerald, and the diamond.  Rubies have a hardness of 9.0 on the Mohs scale of mineral hardness. Among the natural gems only moissanite and diamond are harder, with diamond having a Mohs hardness of 10.0. 

This particular ruby is a Burmese ruby.  It came from northern Myanmar.  some of the world’s finest sapphires, rubies and spinels have been found in the region.

Related post:

https://microscopetalk.wordpress.com/2010/08/23/gemstones-under-microscope/

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Megan has long been a rock collector.  She likes to pick up a rock here and there whenever we go to a park.  The hobby seems to be infectious.  I would pick up a rock or two.  My first trip with Georgia Mineral Society is to collect the lace agate at Summerville, Georgia.   What a perfect location!  The subject for first week of Alan’s social science is the five geographic regions of Georgia.  Summerville is located in the Ridge and Valley region of Georgia (Snellville is located in the Piedmont region).    

The lace agate collection took place at a private quarry just outside of Chattahoochee national forest.  We don’t have any specialize sledge hammer or chisel for rock hounding.  All we have are garden shovels, house hold hammer and garden border chisel but that’s good enough for the site.  We do take the advice of bringing extra bottle of water.  It came in handy when we need to rinse the chalky white chert from the rocks – most rocks here are covered with white dust called chert.  Fortunately, we don’t need much digging tools since most rocks are one the surface.  The quarry has piles and piles of rocks that we can simply pick from the surface.    

Rock collection at Quarry

Most rocks are collected at surface or the rock piles. Only occasional light digging is needed.

 We spends hours washing and brushing the rocks after gone home.  The patterns of the rocks stands out after cleaning.  Here are some macro shots of Summerville Lace Agates with Olympus stylus 7010 snapshot camera in super macro mode.  

The surface of summerville lace agate

The surface of Summerville lace agate

Summerville Lace Agate

Cut the Summerville lace agate vertically. It shows many layers of beautiful lace pattern.

Summerville Lace Agate Mount Cross Cut

Cut session of the mount of Summerville lace agate. It shows concentric circle.

Pattern of Summerville lace agate when the mount was cut in the verticle direction.

Pattern of Summerville lace agate when the mount was cut in the vertical direction.

Pattern of Summerville lace agate - Rib

The pattern of Summerville lace agate looks like a slab of BBQ Rib

The pattern of summerville lace agate shows geometic shapes

The pattern of Summerville lace agate shows geometric shapes

The color of summerville lace agate

Most Summerville lace agate shows the color of brown to yellowish and white. This agate is mostly gray and pale white.

The color of summerville lace agate

Some Summerville lace agate shows up red

Photomicrography* of Summerville Lace Agate  

Summerville Lace Agate Lace Surface

Summerville Lace Agate Lace Surface

The tip of an agate stalagmite was broken to show the circling pattern.

Further deep in to the structure. The concentric circles sometimes show up gray or brown depending on the type of mineral deposits.

A quarter session of the circle shows the details of the direction of the quartz pointing toward and away the center of the circle.

Another photo shows the quarter session of the circle structure. This cross session is more brownish than gray.

Sometime the concentric circle is shown with more distinct lines of brown, white, orange color.

Varieties of lace patterns:   

Summerville Lace Agate Lace Pattern

Summerville Lace Agate - Lace Pattern

Summerville Lace Agate Lace Pattern

Summerville Lace Agate Lace Pattern

Summerville Lace Agate Lace Squared Pattern

Summerville Lace Agate Lace Triangle Pattern

Summerville Lace Agate Lace Triangle Pattern

Found plenty of white geometric shapes in the Summerville lace agate

Summerville Lace Agate Linear Pattern

Summerville Lace Agate Linear Pattern

Occassionally, found some agates with red color.

occasionally, found some agate with red color.

More red colored summerville lace agate

More red colored Summerville lace agate

Some quartz found in the cavity of a summerville lace agate

Some quartz found in the cavity of a Summerville lace agate

Summerville Lace Agate - Quartz

Summerville Lace Agate - Quartz found within the cavity

Quartz found in the agate specimen

Summerville Lace Agates are beautiful rocks.  They are created with unpredictable patterns, geometric shapes and colors.  The quartz on the agates give the rock extra sparks.  The rocks are very pretty even without additional cutting or polishing.  We are going to display some in the original form and polish some with rock tumbler.  That’s will be our next project.  

* Photos are taken with Tucsen 3.0MP CMOS microscope camera from Ample Scientific SM Plus Stereo Microscope.  The color tones of the photomicrograph is somewhat blueish because of the LED illumination while the macro shots with the Olympus Stylus 7010 are using the incandescent lights which results in yellowish color tone.

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The painted lady butterfly (Vanessa ssp.) is wildly distributed across most of the world, with the exception of South America.  It can often be seen in gardens and parks, feeding from cultivated flowers.  The painted lady is a large butterfly (wing span 5–9–cm (2–2 7/8 in)) identified by the black and white corners of its mainly deep orange, black-spotted wings. It has 5 white spots in the black forewing tips and while the orange areas may be pale here and there, there are no clean white dots in them. The American Lady Butterfly’s (Vanessa virginiensis) hindwings carry 2 eyespots on dorsal and ventral sides while the related species Painted Lady Butterfly (Vanessa cardui) has 4. Those on the dorsal side are black, but in the summer morph sometimes small blue pupils are present in some.

Painted Lady Butterfly vs American Lady Butterfly

Differences between painted lady butterfly and American lady butterfly - Courtesy of Kenneth Dwain Harrelson

American Painted Lady Butterfly (Vanessa virginiensis)

American Painted Lady Butterfly (Vanessa virginiensis)

 The painted lady butter that I collected last weekend is an American Painted Lady rather than Painted Lady because it has two eye marks rather than four eye marks on the hingwing.

American Painted Lady Butterfly Head Side View

American Painted Lady Butterfly Head Side View

American Painted Lady Butterfly Head Top View

American Painted Lady Butterfly Head Top View

Eye of American Painted Lady Butterfly

Eye of American Painted Lady Butterfly

Antenna of American Painted Lady Butterfly

Antenna of American Painted Lady Butterfly

The Front Edge of the Wing

The scales of the red mark on the wing

The scales of the red mark on the wing

The scales and vein of the red mark on the wing

The scales and vein of the red mark on the wing

The scales of the "eye mark" of the wing

The scales of the "eye mark" of the wing

The inner edge of the wing showing the scales and the hair

Dense Hair on the Interior Edge of the Wing

Dense Hair on the Interior Edge of the Wing

Hairs on the thorax and Leg

Hairs on the thorax and Leg

End of Abdomen

End of Abdomen

Mouth Part

Mouth Part

Leg

Leg

Photos are taken with Tuscen 3.0 MP CMOS microscope camera through the eyepiece of Ample Scientific SM Plus Stereo Microscope.  The amplificion is either 20 x or 40x.

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